AutoZone Liberty Bowl Scoring

GAMEPLAY

 

Can I make predictions on 4th down?

 

Yes, fans make a prediction on every 4th down play. Predict a field goal, punt, pass, or run, and then choose the outcome of the play.  

 

Can I make predictions on kickoffs?

 

No, fans do not make predictions on kickoff plays.

 

Can I make predictions on extra points or 2-point conversions?

 

No, fans do not make predictions on extra points or 2-point conversion attempts.

 

Can I make predictions when the offense is in hurry-up?

 

Unfortunately not- there is not enough time to make predictions on these plays. You will be notified in the app when a prediction is canceled due to a hurry-up scenario.

 

How will a play be scored when it gains 0 yards? 

 

The play will be scored as loss of yardage. Passes and runs for a loss of yardage or no gain are grouped together. 

 

How will a kneeldown play be scored?

 

Kneeldowns will be scored as a run up the middle for a loss of yardage.

 

PASSING

 

How is the length of a pass attempt determined?

 

The starting point when measuring distance of a pass attempt is always the line of scrimmage. The end point is one of the following:

 

  1. The spot where the ball is caught
  2. The spot where the ball falls incomplete
  3. The spot where the ball passes out of bounds (in the case of an incomplete pass thrown out of bounds)

 

To determine the length of a pass attempt, our scorers measure the distance between the line of scrimmage and the end point, as defined above.

 

How exactly is the end point of an incomplete, tipped, or intercepted pass determined? What are the different scenarios?

 

  • The ball hits the ground in the field of play: This spot is the pass attempt end point

 

  • The ball falls incomplete out of bounds: The end point is the spot in the air where the pass left the field of play

 

  • The ball is intercepted: The end point is the spot where the defender caught the ball

 

  • The ball contacts an offensive player, then bounces either forward or backward in the air: The end point is the spot where the pass contacted the offensive player, unless the ball bounced forward and was caught or intercepted. In this case, the spot where the ball was caught or intercepted is the end point. If the ball bounces backward, the end point is always where the ball contacted the offensive player

 

  • The ball is tipped by a defender, either at the line of scrimmage or down the field: If the ball continues forward and falls incomplete, is caught, or intercepted, the end point is the spot where the ball hits the ground or is caught by an offensive player or defender. If the ball travels backward in the air and falls incomplete, is caught, or intercepted, the end point is the point at which the player batted the ball

 

When judging the length of a pass attempt, does yardage in the end zone count?

 

Yes. While yardage in the end zone does not appear on the stat sheet, it is relevant when identifying different types of passes thrown near the goal line.

 

How will a pass throwaway be scored?

 

The play will be scored as an incomplete pass, and the length of the pass attempt will scored using the criteria described in the earlier section on incomplete passes.

 

When the play design is a pass, but the quarterback ends up scrambling with the ball for a gain of yardage, how will the play be scored? 

 

The play will be scored as a run. 

 

RUSHING

 

How do we define a run up the middle vs. a run outside?

 

When choosing “Middle” or “Outside”, you are attempting to predict the intended design of a run play. If the running back starts up the middle, but bounces a run outside of the tackle, it is still considered a run up the middle. 

 

  • For man blocking schemes: A run designed to go through the A gap (between the center/guard) or B gap (between guard/tackle) is defined as “Middle”. Any run designed to go outside the tackles is defined as “Outside”. 

 

  • For zone blocking schemes: These runs are not designed to go to a specific gap. However, zone runs are designed to flow to the middle or outside of the field, which will determine the designation for these plays.

 

  • For quarterback scrambles: On passing plays where the quarterback ultimately decides to run with the ball, it will all depend on where he crosses the line of scrimmage. If he crosses inside the tackle box, it is a run up the middle, If he crosses outside the tackle box, it is a run to the outside.

 

PENALTIES

 

What happens when there is a penalty? 

 

It depends on the situation- we might score your predictions, or we might cancel them. There are a few different penalty scenarios:

 

 

  • Pre-Snap Penalty
    • Example: False Start
    • Predictions for the play are canceled. After the referee completes the penalty announcement, you will be prompted to make predictions for the next play.

 

 

  • Accepted Penalty During Play
    • Example: Defensive Holding
    • Predictions for the play are canceled. With the outcome on the field influenced by the penalty, it would not be fair to score your predictions. After the referee completes the penalty announcement, you will be prompted to make predictions for the next play.

 

 

  • Declined Penalty During or After Play
    • Example: Defense is offside at the snap, but the offense completes a long pass, resulting in the offside penalty being declined
    • Predictions for the play stand. With the outcome on the field not influenced by a penalty enforcement, we will score your prediction.

 

 

  • Accepted Penalty After Play: 
    • Example: After a pass is completed for 5 yards but no first down, a fight breaks out, resulting in a 15-yard penalty against the defense and an automatic first down for the offense
    • Predictions for the play stand, but the penalty enforcement is not factored into play results when scoring your prediction.